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10 Resume Elements to Energize any Job Search

By Brad - Saturday 12 Jul 1:05 pm

No matter how perfect a person is for a job, potential employers cannot find them without an effective resume. Invigorate your job search with these ten resume updates.

1. Use keywords. Spend any time searching the internet and you notice that the more specific your keywords, the more likely you are to find what you want. The same is true for your job search. Many companies use resume scanning programs that search your resume and cover letter for keywords. Make sure you use what employers are seeking.

2. Limit jargon. While a resume requires effective keywords it should not be buried in jargon. The first person to screen your resume may be a human resources contact or manager with little experience with the jargon. Don’t set your job search up for failure by being unclear or generic.

3. Be honest. Don’t lie on your resume.

4. Use active verbs. With active words your resume will illustrate what you’ve done and won’t look like every other applicant claiming they are organized, self-motivated or responsible.

5. Be specific with short, simple sentences.

6. Leave lots of white space. Don’t jumble or overload your resume. Most initial scans of resumes last less than fifteen seconds. Let your resume demonstrate you are organized and efficient in a single glance.

7. Make it relevant. Don’t put irrelevant jobs on your resume unless they fill a questionable gap in your work history. Provide detail for the skills that are relevant to the job you are applying for.

8. Focus the objective or skills summary to the employer’s needs. Be clear and concise. Vague or extravagant objectives with no focus serve no purpose for the employer. Employers want to know that you can fill their position not that they can fulfill yours.

9. Provide numbers and statistics. When including, for example, that in your previous position you improved customer service, the statement becomes imminently more effective when you say “Improved customer service by five percent in two year period”. Share proof of your accomplishments.

10. Consider a resume critique. Nothing helps your job search better than a second pair of objective eyes looking at your resume.

Make your resume work for you with clear, active statements that the future employer needs to know. Choose quality substance instead of gimmicks and your resume will boost your job search.

Posted in: Job Search

Occupational Therapy Jobs in the Public Sector vs Private Sector

By Brad - Thursday 10 Jul 11:49 am


Occupational therapy jobs have an added advantage over many other employment choices, in that there are equal opportunities available within both the public sector and the private sector. You can find occupational therapy jobs in any hospital, wellness centre, clinic or medical institution, but also within corporate companies, private businesses, home based businesses and within government.


Everything outside of the government is considered private sector, therefore all the hospitals and clinics that fall under government care and funding are regarded as public sector.


The choice to make here is private or public sector? What is the difference between occupational therapy jobs in the private sector as opposed to the public sector?


There are a few details worth mentioning that could make your decision making slightly easier.


  • Applying for occupational therapy jobs in the private sector is a case of you researching available jobs and selecting the ones you would like to apply to. You would then send off your resume to the prospective employers and hope for an interview to take it further
  • Applying for occupational therapy jobs in the public sector involves completion of an application form, submission of all relevant details, for example: Your ID, driver’s license, recommendations from previous employers, copies of all certifications etc. After submission, an extensive background check is completed and then you wait to hear if your application has been approved
  • Within the private sector, you would go for an interview with your intended future employer
  • In the public sector, you would sit before a panel of people within the Health Department for your interview
  • Once you have been accepted in the private sector, you would start working for the company in question
  • Within the public sector, you would only then be given your listing of available jobs and make your choice from there


With regards to actual working environments within both sectors, occupational therapy jobs within the privately owned companies generally pay their employees a little more than public sector institutions do. Plus there is more room to grow and progress within private sector businesses, whereas the setup with public sector health employment is slightly more rigid with less leeway.


On the plus side for public sector, you have the added and maybe most important benefit of job security. In privately owned businesses, if profit margins are becoming too narrow, there is a chance that you could lose your job in order for the company you work for to cut costs.

Posted in: Therapy Jobs

10 Steps to Turn Your Job Search Into a Job

By Brad - Sunday 6 Jul 11:02 am

Job searchers can get stuck searching for months with no results. Finding a job takes more than just posting your resume. Follow ten steps to turn your job search into a job.

  • 1. Focus your job search. Don’t submit as many applications as possible. Apply for jobs if you meet the stated qualifications and are truly interested.
  • 2. Know what you are looking for. The better you know your goals, the more likely you are to choose accurate keywords and focus your job search.
  • 3. Present a professional package. Your cover letter and resume should be clear and concise. Have someone else edit for spelling, typos and inappropriate language. Avoid gimmicks, bright colors and flashy designs.
  • 4. Be prepared for responses. You want callbacks so provide accurate and professional contact information. This means no funny voicemail messages and no caller tunes. Choose a standard ring and professional message for the duration of your job search.
  • 5. Get out of your comfort zone and network. There is truth to the statement it’s not what you know but who you know. Employers hire people they know and like. Join professional or service organizations in your area to show dedication to your field and get your face in front of potential employers.
  • 6. Prepare for the interview. Be prompt and dress professionally. Preparation also includes doing some research about the company. Show them you are interested in them and they will be interested in you.
  • 7. Sell your strengths. Potential employers won’t know what you have to offer unless you are able to communicate your strengths to them.
  • 8. Take risks. This doesn’t mean applying for a dream job you have no qualifications for. Stay informed with what’s up and coming in your industry and look to the smaller companies or start-ups for opportunities.
  • 9. Follow-up. If you haven’t heard back, let them know you are still interested with a follow-up card or email. Consider a thank you after an interview. Don’t be a pest but remind employers you are out there.
  • 10. Hold out for a good match. Don’t accept the first offer if it isn’t the right offer. When times are tough and competition is fierce sometimes you have to take a near fit and that is okay. Just be aware that you are compromising your job search and remain open to finding the perfect fit in the future.

Posted in: Job Search

The Most Important Step in Your Job Search and Why

By Brad - Thursday 5 Jun 6:24 pm

The most important step in your job search starts with you. Knowing what you want in a job is the first priority. Without a goal in mind your job search will be unfocused and haphazard. While a broad search may get results it may not yield positive results.

Whether you are beginning your first search or your fifteenth the same rule applies. Find out what you want. To do so follow some basic steps:

1. Ask yourself why you are searching. Are you just out of school? Have you recently been laid off? Are you tired of your current position and looking for a change? Do you need more money? Your answer is the first step to deciding what you are looking for in your job search.

2. List your strengths. What do you have to offer an employer? Be honest with yourself. If you don’t have experience in a new field can you afford to start in an entry level position? Do you have other strengths to offer that may outweigh your inexperience? Know what you have to offer.

3. Research your options. If you know you want a job in management or insurance for example – start researching to narrow your job search. Type in the keyword management in a job search engine and watch hundreds of jobs appear. Don’t waste hours sorting through these choices. Choose a more specific keyword search for better results.

4. Know what you don’t want. Knowing what you are not willing to live with is just as important as knowing what you want. Make a list of items you will not compromise – be it “I won’t wear a suit every day” or “I hate cubicles”. Avoid the items on your list so you don’t waste your or the employers’ time.

5. Prioritize what you want. Make a list of what you want in your next job and rank the list.

6. Be patient. Finding the right job for you takes time. By limiting your job search to what you really want it may take longer. It might be quicker to do a broad search and take any position you can get but a job you hate will send you back to another job search fast.

Searching for a job takes time, energy and patience. Make the experience more fun and efficient by taking the first step to decide what you want in a job.

Posted in: Job Search

5 Proven Job Search Methods

By Brad - Thursday 5 Jun 6:24 pm

Beginning a job search can be overwhelming whether a person has been recently laid off or is considering options for a growth opportunity. Keep a few simple options in mind and your search will prove successful.

1. Develop an organized system. If you don’t take your job search seriously why would anyone else. Searching for a job is similar to having a job. Set up a schedule for searching, posting resumes, networking and making follow-ups. Make your search a professional priority is taking the first step.

2. Go to the source. If you are looking for a specific position in an industry do not limit yourself to large and generic job search sites. Head directly to the employers you are interested in and apply via their site or human resources department. Do not limit yourself to only the well known employers in your field either; try small and mid-size companies as well.

3. Work with a staffing firm that services your industry. If you’ve sent your resume to the companies you are interested in or if you’ve searched several sites and found no openings, you may need professional help for your job search. Consider a headhunter or staffing service that specializes in your industry. These services have direct and up-to-date contact with potential employers. They will also review your resume and provide insider information about what potential employers are looking for.

4. Network at industry events and through professional organization websites and forums. No matter how old-fashioned you think networking is or how you think the internet has improved job searching, there is little substitute for getting out and making your self known to potential employers.

5. Send cover letters and resumes to a specific person not “to whom it may concern” or to the “hiring manager”. Employers and human resources departments receive resumes and applications by the hundreds. You will be just another number added to the pile or scanned then disposed of unless what you offer stands out. The first step in getting noticed is to get your information to the right party then wow them.

Follow these five simple steps and your job search will begin the journey to a new job in the right direction. Just remember to be consistent and keep following up, you will get the job that is right for you.

Posted in: Job Search